Developmental trends in dating for boys

This finding was at odds with what practitioners attending the workshop said they encounter in their professional experience.

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Or, if he starts to display one of these stereotypes, it’s important to understand the reasons behind it.

According to the 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, approximately 10 percent of adolescents nationwide reported being the victim of physical violence at the hands of a romantic partner during the previous year.[1] The rate of psychological victimization is even higher: Between two and three in 10 reported being verbally or psychologically abused in the previous year, according to the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.[2] As for perpetration rates, there are currently no nationwide estimates for who does the abusing, and state estimates vary significantly.

In South Carolina, for example, nearly 8 percent of adolescents reported being physically violent to a romantic partner.

Interestingly, the rates of reported victimization versus perpetration in the state were similar for boys and girls.[3] However, when it comes to severe teen dating violence — including sexual and physical assault — girls were disproportionately the victims.[4] At a recent workshop on teen dating violence, co-sponsored by the U. Departments of Justice (DOJ) and Health and Human Services (HHS), researchers presented findings from several studies that found that girls and boys perpetrate the same frequency of physical aggression in romantic relationships.

Being Friends with a Teenage Boy Dating a Teenage Boy Raising a Teenage Boy Community Q&A The teenage years are hard on everyone - the teenager themselves, their friends, and their family.

Teenage boys have certain - and sometimes incorrect - stereotypes attached to them, such as always being angry, moody, violent, and rude.These stereotypes are based on, in part, infrequent situations that tend to be remembered.Whether you are the friend, girlfriend or parent of a teenage boy, you should not assume these stereotypes will apply to the boy you know.However, we find that this adult framework does not take into account key differences between adolescent and adult romantic relationships.And so, to help further the discussion, we offer in this article a gender-based analysis of teen dating violence with a developmental perspective.[5] We look at what we know — and what we don't know — about who is the perpetrator and who is the victim in teen dating violence.We also discuss how adult and adolescent romantic relationships differ in the hope that an examination of existing research will help us better understand the problem and move the field toward the creation of developmentally appropriate prevention programs and effective interventions for teenagers.

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